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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been scouting my area during the day for what i assume would be good carp grounds but at this point i'm not even sure i'm looking for the right things. I assumed i should look for a calm surface with little wind so you can spot fins/ripples, an elevated shoreline for a better shot, and a bearing that doesn't leave you staring into the sun's glare.

I have a few more unrelated questions that i I'd like ya'lls input on. Should i try to hunt carp during the day or focus on nights? Do carp like warmer or cooler water? Deeper or shallower? Should I spend more time looking in lakes or in creeks/rivers? And lastly, anybody have a secret spot in West Texas they wanna send me gps coordinates for? :p

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

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I'm from MI, so a lot of this might not apply to you, but I'm gonna give you what USUALLY works around here.

Pre-spawn
Water temps will be in the 50s or cooler. Fish will be staring up larger rivers and staging in large schools on the edge of bigger lakes near weed beds and mudflats.

Spawn
Usually starts when water temps get into the 60s. Fish will be up small shallow ditches, along the shorelines of larger rivers, and in shallow shorelines of big lakes. It's not uncommon to find fish in 3"- 4" of water. They will be rolling and splashing and will be easy to spot. If you get a cold stretch, or the fish just don't seem active on a given day, they will be in 1 of 2 spots...usually NOT both. They will either be as far in shallow as they can get and they will just sit and not move. I've killed many carp walking in 3" of water through cattails over my head. Walk slow and keep your eyes open. They will sit still until you step in them. If you see 1 there will usually be a couple more within a couple feet. If they aren't there, then revert back to where you were finding them during the pre-spawn on the outside of weed beds.

Post spawn
Fish may take a little more time to find. Could still be in the shallow weed beds rooting for food, or they might be back out cruising the edge of the shallows. Just gotta hunt for em, and once you see one there will most likely be more in the same area.
 
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There really is no set rules for where to find fish. They may be in thick enough to walk on one day, and not a fish in sight the next. Just takes time to learn their patterns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
no that'll definitely help next year when the season starts back up, good to know what to look for. thanks man
 

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no that'll definitely help next year when the season starts back up, good to know what to look for. thanks man
No problem. If you have more questions feel free to post up. Lotta good guys on here that have been doing it a lot longer than I have. Hopefully you'll get some input from someone in your area.
 

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when I arrive at a lake or rivers if I don't see any visual signs the next place to start looking is the areas that you know to hold natural food. Areas like weed beds, snags and overhanging trees, run off's water will generally hold carp. High pressured lakes & rivers will make any rough fish spooky & hard to find and will dart at the 1st sign of danger, then you'll only see cloudy water or swirling tale wakes. Thats were it becomes a real schooling. Less pressured rough fish locating them is by looking out for the visual signs and when carp feed they cannot help but show themselves. Another way I find them is by surface disturbance which I call "Head & Shoulder". I shot my biggest israeli carp this way, 42 lb. You hear different way or method of fish'n, theirs no wrong way of looking for locating rough fish. Time & mistakes & experience is the only way you'll know & learn.
 

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I've been scouting my area during the day for what i assume would be good carp grounds but at this point i'm not even sure i'm looking for the right things. I assumed i should look for a calm surface with little wind so you can spot fins/ripples, an elevated shoreline for a better shot, and a bearing that doesn't leave you staring into the sun's glare.

I have a few more unrelated questions that i I'd like ya'lls input on. Should i try to hunt carp during the day or focus on nights? Do carp like warmer or cooler water? Deeper or shallower? Should I spend more time looking in lakes or in creeks/rivers? And lastly, anybody have a secret spot in West Texas they wanna send me gps coordinates for? :p

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
I'm new to bowfishing, and realize this post is 3 years old, but I plan on going to Lake Fryer up around Perryton, Tx. and bowfishing for carp. Are you anywhere close?
 
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